Hunter Henry Discusses Irish Offer

Hunter Henry

Notre Dame reached into Arkansas to offer one of the top tight ends in the nation in Pulaski Academy (Little Rock) standout Hunter Henry, and the 6-foot-6, 240-pounder spoke to IrishEyes.com about it.

It was only a little while after Hunter Henry began speaking with Notre Dame assistant Bob Elliott that the Pulaski Academy (Little Rock, Ark.) tight end pulled in an Irish offer.

So, it stands to reason the 6-foot-6, 240-pound four-star tight end has plenty to learn about Notre Dame.

"We talked a little bit a week or two before, but it was nice to learn I got offer," Henry said. "I know a little bit about them, but I want to investigate and get more in-depth and learn about the coaches. I know they have tradition and a winning mentality back in day."

Henry already visited Alabama and has visits set to Arkansas and Miami. The Irish are also working Henry to come to South Bend, Ind., to check out the program and the campus.

"They have (asked Henry to come) but I'm not really sure right now," he said. "I have to get as many visits as I can. I'm looking at it but we shall see."

One of the things Henry likes about the Irish is their use of the tight end, and the school's history of developing players at the position.

"It's impressive," he said. "It's definitely a draw. It's impressive to see the numbers and what they do with them in different situations, and how they send them to the NFL."

While deciding whether to visit Notre Dame, Henry is looking to continue building his relationship with Elliott.

"He's a good dude," Henry said. "I like him a lot. He's real relaxed and easy to talk to, and to get along with."

As a junior, Henry made 64 catches for 1,093 yards and 16 touchdowns while playing receiver in the spread offense.

"I'm usually split out but sometimes I'll come in tight but I won't put my hand on ground," Henry said. "I feel like I have really good hands. I catch all the time but I guess growing up it's kind of natural. I put in a lot of work catching balls and running routes."

Henry said he is unsure when he will make a decision. Although many of his offers are in the south, he is not locked in to staying close to home.

"The south is my home but I'm able to branch out," he said. "I want to see everything and get a taste of everything else. I'm not set on one place."

IrishEyes.com Recommended Stories